Advanced
Search
  1. Home
  2. What is the difference between arthritis and rheumatism?
What is the difference between arthritis and rheumatism?

What is the difference between arthritis and rheumatism?

  • February 9, 2020
  • 0 Likes
  • 74 Views
  • 0 Comments

It is understandable that you are confused about the difference between arthritis and rheumatism. Although the word rheumatism is no longer in the medical dictionary, it is still used informally to describe symptoms similar to those related to osteoarthritis.

Rheumatism is an ancient word used to describe problems that affect joints and connective tissue. Arthritis refers to various diseases that affect the joints, such as osteoarthritis, gout, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

People often used the word rheumatism when they talk about rheumatoid arthritis or pain in their joints.

Both rheumatism and arthritis are often used to describe various symptoms such as joint pain and inflammation.

It is understandable that you are confused about the difference between arthritis and rheumatism. Although the word rheumatism is no longer in the medical dictionary, it is still used informally to describe symptoms similar to those related to osteoarthritis.

Rheumatism is an ancient word used to describe problems that affect joints and connective tissue. Arthritis refers to various diseases that affect the joints, such as osteoarthritis, gout, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

People often used the word rheumatism when they talk about rheumatoid arthritis or pain in their joints.

What is Arthritis?

Arthritis simply means joint inflammation but is used as a collective term for a family of complex muscle and skeleton disorders, which includes more than 100 different diseases or conditions.

The Arthritis Foundation, a non-profit organization in the United States, estimates that 53 million Americans live with arthritis.

Although the picture that appears in mind when discussing arthritis has to do with older adults, arthritis can affect people of all ages. In fact, two-thirds of arthritis cases occur in adults under 65 and 300,000 children in America suffer from arthritis.

The two most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common types of arthritis and is caused by wear and tear on the joints. Symptoms usually develop gradually and include inflamed or stiff joints, stiffness after rest which improves with movement, pain that worsens after activity or towards the end of the day.

Cartilage protects and tightens joints and prevents bones from rubbing against each other. In osteoarthritis, this cartilage is damaged and lost, so the bones collide painfully.

This could be just because you overuse certain joints. This is called primary osteoarthritis. In certain cases, osteoarthritis can be caused by a condition such as obesity. In this case, we talk about secondary osteoarthritis. Sometimes, the cause of osteoarthritis is unknown.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common form of arthritis. This is an autoimmune disease, which means that the body sees and attacks its own tissues as foreign matter.

With rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system attacks joints and other body parts and produces symptoms such as pain, fatigue and warm, swollen, joints that look like inflammation.

There are more than 200 types of arthritis, but the two most common are Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

What is Rheumatism?

Although the rheumatism is still found in dictionaries and refers to a number of muscular and joint conditions, doctors no longer use the word.

Black’s medical dictionary states that it is an outdated medical term that has no meaning.

Similar words are still used by medical professionals; for example, rheumatoid and rheumatology. A rheumatologist is a doctor who specializes in the treatment of joint and connective tissue disorders.

When non-doctors use the word arthritis they sometimes refer to osteoarthritis when they use the word rheumatism they often mean rheumatoid arthritis.

Is Arthritis and Rheumatism the Same?

Medical practitioners no longer make use of the word rheumatism. Both terms, arthritis and rheumatism are the same but rheumatism is old fashioned.

What is the difference between Arthritis and Rheumatism?

There is no difference between arthritis and rheumatism except that rheumatism is no longer the preferred term to describe the condition.

What causes arthritis?

There are more than 200 types of arthritis, but the two most common are Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis. Osteoarthritis usually develops over time and can affect several different joints. Rheumatoid Arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease that mainly attacks joints and tendons. Women are more likely to develop arthritis than men, especially after menopause, when lower estrogen levels make joint problems more likely.

Experts do not yet know exactly what causes arthritis, but several forms occur in families. Your lifestyle can also affect your risk of this condition. Overuse or injury to certain joints means that there is a higher risk of problems in the future, making athletes or individuals involved in repetitive actions such as cleaners with a higher risk. Carrying extra weight puts extra pressure on the supporting joints in your hips, knees, back, ankles and feet.

Best Treatment for Arthritis

There is currently no cure for arthritis, so treatment has a lot to do with managing your pain. Chiropractic, osteopathy, Physiotherapy and massage maintain joint function. One of the most common drugs is NSAIDs. However, talk with your doctor about other medicines available for your arthritis.

You can try taking glucosamine supplements because glucosamine is the main part of the protein that forms cartilage in the joints. Natural anti-inflammatory remedies are ginger, bromelain, curcumin and Devil’s Claw. Garlic increases blood circulation to the affected joint and thus reduces joint inflammation.

Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in fatty fish like salmon, have anti-inflammatory effects and can also increase joint mobility.

Magnesium can be beneficial because it helps the body absorb calcium which is the basis of healthy bones. Green vegetables, nuts and seeds are rich in magnesium or you can also consume magnesium supplements.

Activity is very important to prevent and improve symptoms of arthritis. Research has shown that people who exercise regularly, even if they only go for a walk, experience less joint pain than people who don’t exercise.

  • Share:

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: